The West Behind Us @release party

If you’re in Portland, Oregon on May 30th please join Lisa Wells and Bobby Abrahamson for the release of The West Behind Us. This is the limited run collector’s edition made possible by Clark College and The Regional Arts & Culture Council. (Stay tuned for the trade edition)

Volume I Brooklyn gave us a nice shout out today. Read more HERE:    Volume I Brooklyn

 

Please join photographer Bobby Abrahamson and writer Lisa Wells for a book release party for their new book — The West Behind Us — at Newspace Center for Photography on Friday, May 30th, from 6-8pm. The authors will talk about the project, have copies of the book for sale, and sign copies. Abrahamson will also have a selection of prints from the project on display and for sale.

The West Behind Us documents four small, rural towns in Oregon – Fields, Mitchell, Long Creek and Halfway – investigating the challenges faced by rural communities in an age of increased urbanization and economic depression. In the tradition of WPA era collaborations like James Agee and Walker Evans’ Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, the book includes 44 striking black and white photographs by documentary photographer Bobby Abrahamson, along with extensive interviews with residents, and first-person narrative by author Lisa Wells. As Dave Blanchard of Oregon Public Broadcasting writes about the project: “The two Portland-based artists understood the challenges of accuracy and exploitation inherent in documenting the lives of others. They traveled to the locations separately, not wanting to come across as offering a definitive account of the towns. They instead focused on their personal connections with the towns and the people who live there.” The results are two independent, complementary visions of life in rural America on the cusp of the urban millennium.

 

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Y.N.T. @ Late Night Debut

Vanessa Veselka & Lidia Yuknavitch chose to discuss Yeah. No. Totally. for Late Night Debut, and I’m pretty much over the moon about it.

Here’s the show: http://latenightlibrary.org/lisa-wells-yeah-no-totally/

I admire Vanessa’s book Zazen very much (so do the folks at PEN: http://redlemona.de/richard-nash/blog/vanessa-veselkas-zazen-wins-the-penrobert-bingham-award-for-best-first-novel)

and Lidia’s groundbreaking memoir, A Chronology of Water (so do the folks at PNBA: http://www.pnba.org/2012BookAwards.html)

They’ve been teaming up on other fronts including this great conversation on women and violence over at the Believer:  http://believermag.tumblr.com/post/17562504296/vanessa-veselka-author-of-zazen-pictured-above

Thanks for reading!

xo — Lisa

Yeah. No. Totally. Featured @ Late Night Library

The good folks over at Late Night Library have kindly chosen to feature Yeah. No. Totally. for the month of January. I feel very lucky to join their ranks of debut authors!

Check them out here: http://latenightlibrary.org/

“Late Night Library is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting talented writers early in their careers. Our programs include two podcast series (Late Night Debut and Late Night Conversation), multi-genre events in Brooklyn and Portland (In and Out of Town Reading Series), a visiting writers series in Portland at Northwest Academy, a national campaign to support independent bookstores and publishers (One for the Books!), an annual prize for early-career authors (the Debut-litzer Award), and a literary journal featuring debut book reviews and interviews with early career authors (Late Night Review).”

In Conversation with Late Night Library

Today Michael Heald of Perfect Day publishing and I talk to Paul Martone of Late Night Library. We talk about the Portland reading scene, small press debuts, and avoiding each other in Nicaragua.

http://www.latenightlibrary.org/post/36064079814/late-night-conversation-perfect-day-publishing

BEAST reviewed @ Calyx

Jyoti Roy reviews BEAST in the summer 2012 issue of Calyx (Vol. 27 no.2) !

“Despite their lyrical beauty, her poems are brutal, almost hopeless in their assessment of our environment and humanity’s place on earth. Yet redemption comes through the very act of shaping language, observing nature, and the crafting of beautiful pieces out of horror. While the situations described may make humanity seem insane, our instinct for life is our saving grace: The road’s yellow stitch hems me to earth/ fragile as a swatch of sun, but enough to keep me driving. (“Airport Poem”)”

 http://www.calyxpress.org/journal.html